Saturday, 22 October 2011

Komijnekaas

Komijnekaas or in English, Cumin Cheese, is very popular in the Netherlands where this type of cheese was first made.



Normally it is made with semi-skimmed milk with 5% buttermilk added to it, as well as the obvious cumin seeds.  So without being too fancy, I decided to make my own variety of komijnekaas using my basic farmhouse cheddar recipe as the base. Usually the Dutch use Gouda as the base for this cheese, but from experience, my Gouda does not taste very nice, so I went with a cheese that I knew was very nice.

I made the cheese as normal in my 14 litre pot with 13.7 litres of milk.  As I was heating up the milk to 33C I added 5ml of calcium chloride mixed with half a cup of water, as I was using homogenised milk.  In a smaller saucepan I bought 1 tablespoon of cumin seeds and 1 teaspoon of caraway seeds to the boil in 3/4 cup of water.  Once boiling, I simmered for 15 minutes, then strained the seeds and kept the water.  When the milk reached the target temp of 33C, I added the cumin water which was a nice yellow/brown colour.

I then proceed to make the cheese as normal until milling.  After the 2 tablespoons salt was added to the milled cheese, I added the cumin/caraway seeds and mixed well, then pressed as per my normal recipe into two 1kg moulds.



This is what it looks like now that it is out of the mould and air drying for the next week.



As I have mentioned before, herbs and spices can add such a different perspective to an ordinary cheese and turn it into something extraordinary!



I am so looking forward to tasting my creation in two months time.

6 comments:

  1. Oh YUM! Cumin is one of my favourite spices, that looks wonderful!

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  2. Gavin, you may want to check out Ricki Carroll's website for an updated Gouda recipe. It worked out well for me. I added caraway seeds to a 2 lb. gouda per Home Cheesemaking but followed the website method. The cheese was tasty and melted well in grilled cheese sandwiches on homemade whole wheat bread. I'm sure your cheddar will be delicious! Let us know is a couple of months.

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  3. @Melinda, mine too!

    @ craftyrabbit. I will check it out, as I must have done something wrong last time I made it.

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  4. Loving your blog. I am a new cheese convert and just made my first farmhouse cheddar last night. I am looking forward to trying some of your recipes. I found the video tutorial very helpful.
    Jen

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  5. Hi Jen, Thanks for dropping by the blog. Glad you got some value out of the video tutorial, and even happier that you took the next step and made some yummy farmhouse cheddar.

    Gav x

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  6. Hi Gavin

    I'm new to cheese making, and enjoy your site and advise. Have your Wensleydale and Pyrenees in the "cave" at the moment. My first 2 attempts, farmhouse cheddar and monterey jack had a slight bitter aftertaste. Is this normal, or any thoughts on what causes it?

    Cheers

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