Little Green Cheese https://www.littlegreencheese.com Cheese making at home with Gavin Webber the Cheeseman Tue, 13 Apr 2021 02:53:37 +0000 en-AU hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.7.1 Cheese making at home has never been so easy. Tips and methods that will help you perfect your cheese, as well as interviews with amateur home cheese makers throughout the world. Gavin Webber clean episodic Gavin Webber gavin@littlegreencheese.com gavin@littlegreencheese.com (Gavin Webber) 2010-2019 Gavin Webber Cheese Making at Home with Gavin Webber Little Green Cheese https://www.littlegreencheese.com/wp-content/uploads/powerpress/LGC_Logo_3000px_New.jpg https://www.littlegreencheese.com Melton West Melton West Support the Podcast! Support the Podcast! 96548657 LGC084 – Artisan Cheese goes Online During COVID https://www.littlegreencheese.com/2020/06/lgc084-artisan-cheese-goes-online.html?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=lgc084-artisan-cheese-goes-online https://www.littlegreencheese.com/2020/06/lgc084-artisan-cheese-goes-online.html#respond Fri, 19 Jun 2020 12:30:00 +0000 https://www.littlegreencheese.com/?p=2964 Welcome back, curd nerds. Starting again after a long break in between audio episodes. I have also created a YouTube channel for the podcast which you can find at Little Green Cheese Podcast with Gavin Webber. Anyway, back into the episodes which will be weekly from now onwards. Download podcast episode here Cheese news Family […]

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Welcome back, curd nerds. Starting again after a long break in between audio episodes. I have also created a YouTube channel for the podcast which you can find at Little Green Cheese Podcast with Gavin Webber. Anyway, back into the episodes which will be weekly from now onwards.

Download podcast episode here

Cheese news

Family business feeds Australia cheese to save an iconic industry

This week’s Listener questions are from the following curd nerds;

  • Adam asked if you can add Penicillium Candidum to the salt when salting the cheese
  • John wanted to know if it is okay for the curds to have 1/2″ (1.25 cm) of whey on top after coagulation.
  • Miguel would like the link for the cheese drying mats that I used in some of my videos.
  • Ruth wanted to know if you can use aluminium wires on a curd cutter and about early blown cheeses.
  • Sandi wants a cheese fridge but doesn’t know how to set it up and how to adjust big batches of milk to smaller wheels, and
  • Soren was interested in adding rum or whiskey to his cheese.

ASK A QUESTION FOR THE PODCAST

Don’t forget that you can leave a voicemail message that I will answer and feature during the show.  Just remember that I cannot answer them straight away, so please don’t expect an instant reply.

My Speakpipe page for voicemails

Support the show!

If you would like to support the podcast and YouTube channel so I can make new and interesting cheeses and cheese related content, then please support me via Patreon.

SPONSORED BY…

This podcast is sponsored by Little Green Workshops where you can pick up your cheese making kits and supplies.  We stock a large range of cheese making gear and ship to Australia and most countries throughout the world.

Until next time Curd Nerds, Keep Calm and Make Cheese!

LIKE WHAT YOU'VE READ OR HEARD?



The post LGC084 – Artisan Cheese goes Online During COVID appeared first on Little Green Cheese.

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https://www.littlegreencheese.com/2020/06/lgc084-artisan-cheese-goes-online.html/feed 0 Welcome back, curd nerds. Starting again after a long break in between audio episodes. I have also created a YouTube channel for the podcast which you can find at Little Green Cheese Podcast with Gavin Webber. Anyway, Welcome back, curd nerds. Starting again after a long break in between audio episodes. I have also created a YouTube channel for the podcast which you can find at Little Green Cheese Podcast with Gavin Webber. Anyway, back into the episodes which will be weekly from now onwards.







Download podcast episode here



Cheese news



Family business feeds Australia cheese to save an iconic industry



This week's Listener questions are from the following curd nerds;



* Adam asked if you can add Penicillium Candidum to the salt when salting the cheese* John wanted to know if it is okay for the curds to have 1/2" (1.25 cm) of whey on top after coagulation.* Miguel would like the link for the cheese drying mats that I used in some of my videos.* Ruth wanted to know if you can use aluminium wires on a curd cutter and about early blown cheeses.* Sandi wants a cheese fridge but doesn't know how to set it up and how to adjust big batches of milk to smaller wheels, and* Soren was interested in adding rum or whiskey to his cheese.



ASK A QUESTION FOR THE PODCAST



Don’t forget that you can leave a voicemail message that I will answer and feature during the show.  Just remember that I cannot answer them straight away, so please don’t expect an instant reply.



My Speakpipe page for voicemails



Support the show!



If you would like to support the podcast and YouTube channel so I can make new and interesting cheeses and cheese related content, then please support me via Patreon.



SPONSORED BY…



This podcast is sponsored by Little Green Workshops where you can pick up your cheese making kits and supplies.  We stock a large range of cheese making gear and ship to Australia and most countries throughout the world.



Until next time Curd Nerds, Keep Calm and Make Cheese!






LIKE WHAT YOU'VE READ OR HEARD?















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Gavin Webber clean 31:47 2964
Rennet Strength Explained https://www.littlegreencheese.com/2019/07/rennet-strength-explained.html?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=rennet-strength-explained https://www.littlegreencheese.com/2019/07/rennet-strength-explained.html#comments Wed, 31 Jul 2019 12:12:57 +0000 https://www.littlegreencheese.com/?p=2933 I was recently asked by James the following question; I am confused on the IMCU standards, I see 200IMCU, 240IMCU, 280IMCU and I don’t understand the varying strengths and the scale of strengths. Is the higher the number stronger or lower the number? Any insight into IMCU would be greatly appreciated. When I first started […]

The post Rennet Strength Explained appeared first on Little Green Cheese.

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I was recently asked by James the following question;

I am confused on the IMCU standards, I see 200IMCU, 240IMCU, 280IMCU and I don’t understand the varying strengths and the scale of strengths. Is the higher the number stronger or lower the number? Any insight into IMCU would be greatly appreciated.

When I first started making cheese, I was also perplexed by this question. Do I just go on blind faith that the manufacturer has given me the correct instructions on the bottle? What does the acronym IMCU mean? Let’s learn more.

International Milk Clotting Unit

IMCU stands for International Milk Clotting Unit as defined in International Standard ISO 11815 (2007). It is a very technical document so I will try and break it down into a definition that a layman can understand. I like the KISS (Keep It Simple, Stupid) principle when explaining things.

Basically, one milk‐coagulating unit (U) is defined as the amount of the rennet enzyme that coagulates 10 mL of reconstituted skimmed milk powder at 30°C in 100 seconds. So how does that help us? Let’s break that down further into something we can better relate to.

Commercial rennet is available in Single, Double, and sometimes Triple strength. Rarely have I seen the IMCU/mL listed on rennet bottles that can be purchased at cheese making suppliers, but many do mention how many millilitres are required to set 8 to 10 Litres of milk. This is a good thing, right? The higher the IMCU/mL number for your rennet, the stronger it is, and you need less of it to set the same amount of milk.

From what I’ve researched, Single strength is considered to be that concentration of rennet where 200 ml is sufficient to set 1,000 kg of milk in 30 – 40 minutes at 30 – 32C. Setting time is the point where the curd will break cleanly and exude clear whey.

This differs from coagulation time which is the point where flecks of curd first appear on a spatula or slide dipped into the milk. Coagulation time is about half that of setting time, so typically, coagulation using single strength rennet requires 15-20 minutes followed by setting at 30-40 minutes.

Working It Out

So knowing that you can work out how much rennet to use for a firm set using the following calculation. If the IMCU of your rennet is 200IMCU/ml you multiply 200 x 0.01. This calculates the amount of milk in Litres that 1 millilitre of the 200IMCU rennet would set. So in this example, 1 ml would set 2 litres of milk. So to figure out how much rennet to use in 10 litres of milk you divide 10 by 2 which gives you 5. Therefore, it would take 5ml of this rennet to firmly set 10 Litres of milk at 32C in about 30 to 40 minutes.

So, if you had 280IMCU/ml rennet, then it is 280 x 0.01 = 2.8. It would take 1 ml to set 2.8 litres of milk. Once again, divide 10 by 2.8 which is 3.6. So 3.6 mL of rennet would be used to set 10 litres of milk.

Now, this is all fine and dandy, but there is another variable that throws this into confusion. The pH of the milk also affects the set time as does the amount of soluble calcium in the milk. Also, different types of cheese need different setting times. Some of my recipes state that you use 2.5 ml (1/2 teaspoon) of single strength rennet to set 10 litres and others state to use 5 ml (1 teaspoon) to set the same amount. It all depends on how acidic the milk is and if you have added Calcium chloride as to how quickly it will set.

Best Milk?

Another factor which can influence the coagulation process is the extent of pasteurization of the milk (or in other words how much the proteins in the milk have been denatured). Raw milk will coagulate faster than pasteurized milk on this basis and in the extreme, we know the dangers of using UHT milk for cheesemaking. You can learn more about the best type of cows milk to use for cheese making in this post.

Rennet Strength Explained
Checking for a clean break

Flocculation Method

Enter the Flocculation Method of determining the best curd set.

The Flocculation Method is a way to test the point of coagulation after adding the rennet to your milk.  Using a factor (determined by the type of cheese you are making), you multiply the time taken for the flocculation point to help you predict the best time for curd set.

So here is the process.

  1. After acidification time, add your rennet when the recipe states.  Start a timer so you know how many minutes have elapsed.
  2. Leave the milk for five minutes, then take a sterilised small plastic bowl and place it on the surface. It should float.
  3. Then spin the bowl gently, whereby it should rotate freely.  Do this every minute or two.
  4. You should notice that at around the 8-minute mark you may find slight resistance from the milk, test by spinning every 30 seconds.
  5. Between 10 and 15 minutes, the bowl should become ‘stuck’, indicating that the curd mass has formed.  This is the flocculation point.  It may take longer, so don’t panic.  Keep testing till the curds set.
  6. Once set, don’t try to spin the bowl any more, just remove it gently and note the time elapsed.

Watch what I mean in this video.

Now you have to multiply the flocculation point time against a factor listed in the table below. (Source: Cheese Forum Wiki)

Cheese typeFactor
Swiss & Alpine types, Parmesan, Romano2 – 2.5
Cow’s milk Cheddar2.5 – 3
Monterey jack, Caerphilly3.5
Feta & Blues4
Camembert & Brie5 – 6

The factor (normally between 2 and 6) is multiplied by the time it took to reach flocculation point, giving you the time to cut the curd.

So if flocculation time is, for example, 15 minutes, then for Parmesan, total time since adding rennet to when the cut is 37 minutes 30 seconds (15 minutes multiplied by 2.5.  So use this table to help determine the optimum time to cut the curd for the type of cheese you are making.

The Cheese Forum states;

“The reason for the different multipliers for different cheese type recipes is because the curd at time of cutting will have different strength, young curd set will more readily release water when cut versus older curd set will release less.”

A soft cheese usually has a higher flocculation time, and a larger curd cut, keeping more moisture in the cheese.

A hard cheese, on the other hand, has a lower flocculation time, and a smaller curd cut, releasing more whey for a firmer, drier cheese.

So this is why fresh cheese is moist and harder cheeses are drier!

Summary

So in summary, rennet strength is measured in IMCU but actual renneting time depends on the style of cheese that you are making and the milk you are using. Hopefully, this post has taken a little bit of the mystery out of the cheese-making process!

The post Rennet Strength Explained appeared first on Little Green Cheese.

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LGC083 – How to Make Cheese After the Apocalypse! https://www.littlegreencheese.com/2019/03/lgc083-how-to-make-cheese-after-the-apocalypse.html?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=lgc083-how-to-make-cheese-after-the-apocalypse https://www.littlegreencheese.com/2019/03/lgc083-how-to-make-cheese-after-the-apocalypse.html#comments Tue, 05 Mar 2019 07:59:15 +0000 https://www.littlegreencheese.com/?p=2828 Back behind the microphone for another season of podcast episodes, I am looking forward to bringing you some excellent interviews. This one is no exception. Download podcast episode here Today I caught up with Ritic (that’s his pen name) and we talked at length about how to make cheese after an Apocalypse scenario. Here is […]

The post LGC083 – How to Make Cheese After the Apocalypse! appeared first on Little Green Cheese.

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Back behind the microphone for another season of podcast episodes, I am looking forward to bringing you some excellent interviews. This one is no exception.

Download podcast episode here

Today I caught up with Ritic (that’s his pen name) and we talked at length about how to make cheese after an Apocalypse scenario.

Here is how he pitched the interview to me.

“Dear Mr. Webber,

I’ve been a big fan of your youtube channel for a long time now, and I’ve always found you a great source of information and entertainment. You’re a youtube channel that I can listen to before bed, relaxing me enough to sleep while also keeping me interested enough that I don’t lose consciousness.

I write to you today because I’m an author and I’m doing research for a story. I was hoping that you could help me with some details.

The story is a post-apocalyptic one, about a group of individuals trying to build a society. At one point, they will be gaining a few cows as part of a trade with other survivors in exchange for medical supplies. However, they will be getting more milk than their small community can drink or make into butter, and will be faced with the problem of what to do with it. Naturally, my first thought was cheese. And so I thought of you.

I was curious about your opinions on what kind of cheese a group could make to preserve their milk, given minimal resources. I was also curious about what things could go wrong for a group of people who have to use a campfire and rudimentary equipment when making whatever cheese(s) you suggest. These people aren’t perfect, and even if one of them knows the basics of making cheese, it will be their first attempts. Further, their knowledge comes from information that they read once before the apocalypse; they’ve never actually made it themselves before now. I don’t like writing perfect people, and I find that people who make mistakes and have to struggle through them are far more interesting than people who get it right every time.

Any and all information that you might be able to give me would be greatly appreciated. Thank you for your time.

Sincerely, Ritic (my pen name) “

ASK A QUESTION FOR THE PODCAST

Don’t forget that you can leave a voicemail message that I will answer and feature during the show.  Just remember that I cannot answer them straight away, so please don’t expect an instant reply.

Support the show!

If you would like to support the podcast and YouTube channel so I can make new and interesting cheeses and cheese related content, then please support me via Patreon.

SPONSORED BY…

This podcast is sponsored by Little Green Workshops where you can pick up your cheese making kits and supplies.  We stock a large range of cheese making gear and ship to Australia and most countries throughout the world.

Until next time Curd Nerds, Keep Calm and Make Cheese!

LIKE WHAT YOU'VE READ OR HEARD?



The post LGC083 – How to Make Cheese After the Apocalypse! appeared first on Little Green Cheese.

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https://www.littlegreencheese.com/2019/03/lgc083-how-to-make-cheese-after-the-apocalypse.html/feed 4 Back behind the microphone for another season of podcast episodes, I am looking forward to bringing you some excellent interviews. This one is no exception. Download podcast episode here Today I caught up with Ritic (that's his pen name) and... Back behind the microphone for another season of podcast episodes, I am looking forward to bringing you some excellent interviews. This one is no exception.







Download podcast episode here



Today I caught up with Ritic (that's his pen name) and we talked at length about how to make cheese after an Apocalypse scenario.



Here is how he pitched the interview to me.



"Dear Mr. Webber,I've been a big fan of your youtube channel for a long time now, and I've always found you a great source of information and entertainment. You're a youtube channel that I can listen to before bed, relaxing me enough to sleep while also keeping me interested enough that I don't lose consciousness.I write to you today because I'm an author and I'm doing research for a story. I was hoping that you could help me with some details.The story is a post-apocalyptic one, about a group of individuals trying to build a society. At one point, they will be gaining a few cows as part of a trade with other survivors in exchange for medical supplies. However, they will be getting more milk than their small community can drink or make into butter, and will be faced with the problem of what to do with it. Naturally, my first thought was cheese. And so I thought of you.I was curious about your opinions on what kind of cheese a group could make to preserve their milk, given minimal resources. I was also curious about what things could go wrong for a group of people who have to use a campfire and rudimentary equipment when making whatever cheese(s) you suggest. These people aren't perfect, and even if one of them knows the basics of making cheese, it will be their first attempts. Further, their knowledge comes from information that they read once before the apocalypse; they've never actually made it themselves before now. I don't like writing perfect people, and I find that people who make mistakes and have to struggle through them are far more interesting than people who get it right every time.Any and all information that you might be able to give me would be greatly appreciated. Thank you for your time.Sincerely, Ritic (my pen name) "



ASK A QUESTION FOR THE PODCAST



Don’t forget that you can leave a voicemail message that I will answer and feature during the show.  Just remember that I cannot answer them straight away, so please don’t expect an instant reply.







Support the show!



If you would like to support the podcast and YouTube channel so I can make new and interesting cheeses and cheese related content, then please support me via Patreon.



SPONSORED BY…



This podcast is sponsored by Little Green Workshops where you can pick up your cheese making kits and supplies.  We stock a large range of cheese making gear and ship to Australia and most countries throughout the world.



Until next time Curd Nerds, Keep Calm and Make Cheese!






LIKE WHAT YOU'VE READ OR HEARD?















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Gavin Webber clean 31:28 2828
Cheese A Day Challenge https://www.littlegreencheese.com/2019/02/cheese-a-day-challenge.html?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=cheese-a-day-challenge https://www.littlegreencheese.com/2019/02/cheese-a-day-challenge.html#respond Sun, 17 Feb 2019 10:30:33 +0000 https://www.littlegreencheese.com/?p=2815 During the month of February 2019, I decided that it was high time to start tasting different cheeses from around the world and Australia that were available from my local supermarkets. A Cheese A Day Challenge if you like. I thought that it would be an interesting experiment and broaden my cheese palate. It would […]

The post Cheese A Day Challenge appeared first on Little Green Cheese.

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During the month of February 2019, I decided that it was high time to start tasting different cheeses from around the world and Australia that were available from my local supermarkets. A Cheese A Day Challenge if you like.

I thought that it would be an interesting experiment and broaden my cheese palate. It would also help me appreciate my own homemade cheese a lot better.

There were two conditions to the challenge that I gave myself. One, I had to eat a different style of cheese each and every day for 28 days, and two, I had to be able to source them in my town without too much effort, usually from a supermarket chain at a reasonable cost. After all, this was not going to be a sponsored challenge, I had to buy the cheese myself so as to make it as objective as possible.

I knew that a video a day may be taxing on my time, but I have managed to work out a schedule for production without too many issue.

So without further ado, here is every single video that I have produced so far and automatically gets updated as I add new challenge video each day.

Please enjoy the Cheese A Day Challenge and check out all the exciting cheese that I have managed to find. I realise that not everyone will be able to source the exact cheese that I did, but you should be able to find a suitable substitute in you region.

If you cannot see the videos below, use this link to view the playlist on YouTube.

The post Cheese A Day Challenge appeared first on Little Green Cheese.

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Curd Nerd Academy Now Open https://www.littlegreencheese.com/2019/02/curd-nerd-academy-now-open.html?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=curd-nerd-academy-now-open https://www.littlegreencheese.com/2019/02/curd-nerd-academy-now-open.html#comments Thu, 14 Feb 2019 05:17:00 +0000 https://www.littlegreencheese.com/?p=2800 Finally, I’ve done it! I made my first online cheese making course, the Curd Nerd Academy. Recently I worked diligently on producing an online cheese making course so that I could share my cheese making skills globally and not just locally here in Melbourne, Australia. Local classes were just that, confined to my local area […]

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Finally, I’ve done it! I made my first online cheese making course, the Curd Nerd Academy.

Recently I worked diligently on producing an online cheese making course so that I could share my cheese making skills globally and not just locally here in Melbourne, Australia. Local classes were just that, confined to my local area and people had to travel many kilometres to attend them. It also inhibited people outside my area from learning the necessary skills to make their own cheese at home.

So I am glad to announce that the Curd Nerd Academy Beginners cheese making course is now available to enrol in.

By the end of the course you will be able to make nine amazing cheeses in your own home and have a thorough the knowledge of the cheese making process.

Here is a video teaser that I created that has more information.

So for those of you who are interested, you can look at the full course curriculum at courses.littlegreenworkshops.com.au.

I hope to see you in the Curd Nerd Academy!

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