Monday, 13 October 2014

LGC 034 - Coagulation

Did you know that there are three types of coagulation in the cheesemaking process?  Well let me enlighten you in the episode that covers the basics of coagulation and tips for getting your curd to set just right.

This weeks news is a cheese making resource that I recently stumbled upon.  ChannelCheese.tv is a television show that airs on TVS44 in Sydney.  Hosted by Alison Brien, the show travels around the world to look at different artisan cheese makers and how they make traditional and not so traditional cheese on a small scale.  Worth having a look.  I played a part of an episode that featured Justin Teller from Bangalow Cheese Co, Byron Bay NSW, which has since changed names to the Byron Bay Cheese Co.  He made a very interesting and gold medal winning washed rind cheese.

We also have a voicemail from Søren in Denmark whose question was featured in Episode 32.  He has been experimenting with iodised salt in his cheese making.  He has produced some interesting results.  Below are some of the cheeses that he has made with this type of salt.


Other questions were about the differences between Animal and vegetable rennet, Ricotta Salata, Anti-caking agent in salt, and adding moulds from commercial cheese into your own.




Don't forget that if you like this podcast, and would like to help promote it as a personal favour to me, please head over to iTunes and give it a rating and a honest review. Once you have clicked on the link, then click the "view on iTunes" button and leave a review.

This helps raise the podcast in the iTunes charts, which ranks against the likes of world famous food podcasters like Jamie Oliver, Nigella Lawson, and Martha Stewart to name a few. Any help would be fantastic if you have the time.

A special thanks goes out to to all of you who have left the show a review and rating.  I really appreciate your honesty and time.

If you wish to receive the show on your portable apple device each time I release an episode, you can subscribe via iTunes or Stitcher Radio.



So, until next time curd nerds, remember to Keep Calm and Make Cheese!

Monday, 6 October 2014

Homemade Coffee Cheese (Kaffeost)

This recipe was passed on to me by Chris Kridakorn-Odbratt, who lives in the Jungles of Laos.

I am yet to try this out, but seeing I live in a city with a pretty big coffee culture, I would be crazy not to try this out pretty soon.  Chris sent through a couple of photos, so you can get an idea of what this cheese is all about!



Here is the recipe;

Homemade Coffee Cheese


Coffee cheese originally made from the milk warm, straight from a cow or reindeer and used in coffee as a kind of snack. Irresistible for a Northern Swede in general and a Tornedaling (border to Finland) in particular! At least if they belong to the middle-aged generation with a plus sign ...
If you have no barn, or reindeer (as the best Coffee Cheese is made from), use whole milk or preferably raw milk...

Ingredients


2 liters of milk
60 ml heavy cream
2 tsp rennet (available at the pharmacy and in some stores)

Method


  1. Pour the milk and cream in a 3-liter saucepan
  2. Heat to lukewarm (37 degrees C)
  3. Lift off the pan and mix in rennet. Let stand for about 30-40 minutes until the liquid has solidified ( curdled itself )
  4. Stir gently with a slotted spoon while you heat up the liquid to lukewarm again .
  5. Steer meanwhile the cheese from the edges toward the center of the pan .
  6. When the cheese is gathered into a ball in the middle heat the whole thing up to the boiling point - but it should not boil ! Take the pan off the heat just before the whey boils.
  7. Place the cheese in a fine mesh colander / strainer large / or in a cheese mold if you have one of those.
  8. Press out as much whey as possible out of the cheese. Set a weight and leave for a few hours so the last whey is pressed out and the cheese gets dry .
  9. Preheat the oven to 200 degrees C. Press the cheese into a well greased casserole dish - cheese should be a maximum of 3 cm thick. Bake the cheese in center of oven until browned. The cheese can also be used without baking but I think it will be tastier to bake it.
  10. If the edges become hard - wrap the warm cheese in aluminum foil afterwards so they soften.
  11. When the cheese has cooled - cut into small cubes or strips, put a pile in the coffee cup and fill the cup with fresh coffee . 
  12. Stir and eat with a spoon .... enjoy the taste and the sound ....
If there is anything left - package well and freeze down or make dessert with warm cloudberries or raspberry coulis. The whey may be used as liquid to bake soft bread.


What do you think?  Who is going to try this and report back to the curd nerd community?

Monday, 29 September 2014

LGC 033 - Mozzarella Feedback

This week I have a special guest, my daughter Amy who talks about her experience during my very first Mozzarella workshop many years ago.


I also answer questions about waxing, humidity, moulds, aging of camembert, and leaf wrapped cheese.

Also a call out to Ian Treuer who's cheese making blog "Much to do About Cheese" is quickly becoming a knowledge base for the home cheese maker.

I also announce that the second edition of Keep Calm and Make Cheese has been published and it now available at my eBookstore.  It contains four new recipes and three additional video tutorials for you to enjoy.

As promised, here is a photo of Allen's Camembert.  They look pretty good to me!





Also, don't forget that if you like this podcast, and would like to help promote it as a personal favour to me, please head over to iTunes and give it a rating and a honest review.  Once you have clicked on the link, then click the "view on iTunes" button and leave a review.

This helps raise the podcast in the iTunes charts, which ranks against the likes of world famous food podcasters like Jamie Oliver, Nigella Lawson, and Martha Stewart to name a few.  Any help would be fantastic if you have the time.

If you wish to receive the show on your portable apple device each time I release an episode, you can subscribe via iTunes or Stitcher Radio.



Listen to Stitcher

So, until next time curd nerds, remember to Keep Calm and Make Cheese!